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View of High Sierra March 28

Dear PCT class of 2017

2017 snow pack is the biggest whomper we have seen in 20 years. Forget about 2005 and 2011, we are entering new territory with just about as much (well, more) snow but more heat from our warming planet. Snow is not only STILL falling in the Sierra, but has begun to melt, with significantly high and early – dangerous – runoff.

PORTLAND: LEARN TO SEW A CYCLING CAP!

If you’ve wanted to set aside the time to finally make yourself a cycling cap, why not book a class? Meet some new people, have help to get over any tricky bits, and check that project off your list?

Ellie at Klum House, a professional seamstress and sewing instructor, is teaching a cap sewing class in Portland, Oregon on Saturday, November 5 from 1 to 5pm.

Level 2 Sewing Class: Some prior sewing experience needed

Ever wanted to make your own cycling cap? Well, here’s your chance! The cycling cap is an essential part of a cyclists daily wear — performing the multiple functions of keeping the sun & rain out of your eyes while providing an under-layer to your helmet- all the while adding style to your look.

This class takes functional sewing projects to the next level. A cycling cap is a great project to spend… continue reading

stevens canyon exit canyon

Hayduke Desert Panoramas

My 850-mile backpacking trip this Spring took me through Southern Utah and Northern Arizona, through all these National Parks and wild lands I’d never seen before. What better way to see them for the first time than to walk through them and sleep in their dirt? I couldn’t think of one.

I took some neato panoramic photos, so maybe the next best way to look at them is to click on them, blow them up in your browser, look around, and pretend you’re there. Most these iPhone panoramas were taken in remote areas, difficult to get to by car or foot, and most of them were on detours or alternates off the main Hayduke route. Get yourself an eye full of red rock!

Arches Canyonlands

I took a lot of detours off the route on this trip to see things, like “The Loop” of the Colorado River, where it folds… continue reading

Portland: Learn to Sew a Cycling Cap!

If you’ve wanted to set aside the time to finally make yourself a cycling cap, why not book a class? Meet some new people, have help to get over any tricky bits, and check that project off your list?

Ellie at Klum House, a professional seamstress and sewing instructor, is teaching a cap sewing class in Portland, Oregon on Sunday, June 12 from noon to 4pm.

The classes are $60 and you walk away with a nice-fitting cap that YOU made!

You can use the coupon “CAPSNOTHATS2016” to get 35% off

velocipede races close up

Velocipede Races Cover

This time last year I was reading a quick and fun book by Emily June Street called The Velocipede Races, preparing to illustrate its cover. The book centers around a young woman’s passion for cycling, is tinged with steampunky Victoriana, and is also digestibly feminist. In short, I totally enjoyed it and had no trouble finding inspiration to design its new cover. I decided to use a papercutting/scherenschnitte style and incorporate the corset, trying to capturing a mood… of a sporty lady craving to burst out of that delicate corset.

Here’s what I initially submitted to Elly Blue over at Microcosm Publishing:

velocipede races early design

To my surprise, the advance copy went black, which I’m glad was a temporary shift! It still looked… continue reading

Leave No Trace in Advertising

I’ve been shopping for new gear for 2016 and something is bugging me…

So here’s my call out to manufacturers and users of tents and sleeping bags and camp stoves and other camping gear. All outdoor folk who love nature. (Hopefully that includes you.)

Stop advertising gear with images that clearly violate the Leave No Trace ethic.

Stop glamorizing these violations.

Instead, set great examples of people camping using LNT principles.

Dude. What are you talking about?!

More specifically, I’m talking about images of camps set up right on the sides of lakes. They’re so pretty, but they’re so… wrong.

Please stop posting photographs of tents pitched less than 200 feet from idyllic lakes. Less than 100 feet from lakes. Less than 50 feet from lakes!

What’s the problem with camping near water?

I’d like to camp right by the water. It doesn’t seem… continue reading

talus

SHR Talus Report

I wouldn’t say I had too many surprises this summer on the Sierra High Route (SHR). I was fairly lucky with weather, I had warm gear, almost enough food, and navigation worked out well. I only had two death-defying falls. One thing stands out about this hike and that thing is exceptional amounts of talus. Now that I think about it, talus caused both of my falls (1, 2).

Talus, Talus, Talus

So much talus. Talus fields. More talus than you can shake a stick at. Talus coming out your ears. Talus rainbows. Talus, talus, talus.

What is talus?

ta·lus: a sloping mass of rock fragments at the foot of a cliff.

Pics of SHR talus will give you the idea:

Talus is tricky. Over time, as one hikes over miles and miles of talus field, one might become a TALUS MASTER. One will know in… continue reading

More Sierra High Route “Bonus Miles”

Abram – the mysterious fellow I met on my L2H hike in October – introduced me to the concept of “bonus miles.”

We’re lucky enough as it is to be hiking, thus, any extra miles hiked to get here or there that aren’t on the itinerary are “bonus miles.”

Bonus Miles – Pics

These are shots from the bonus miles tagged to the end of my Sierra High Route trek.

I was done with this epic route at around 1pm October 21st, but I was still deep in the Sierra. A matter of note – the old Taboose Pass trail is very cool. It’s marked on topo maps but little-traveled, a tiny bit hard to find in spots, and quite steep, but I loved it. I took it on the way out for variety.

It wasn’t until about 1pm on the 22nd that I set foot back in Lone Pine…. continue reading

Sierra High Route Part 1: Roads End to Taboose Pass

October 19 – Road’s End to Granite Basin

This 35-mile bit of the SHR took me 5 days (an extra day to hike 20 miles to the trailhead, and an extra day to hike 10+ miles out). On the afternoon of October 19th, I made it to Road’s End. I had already covered ten miles in the morning; here are the next ten.

Going up Copper Creek Trail made for one of the more difficult days I’ve had on trail. It was a gorgeous, groomed trail, even after angry storms blew through the week before. But this trail is straight up. From 5036 feet at the trailhead to of something like that to the 10,347 feet at the Granite Basin lip – that’s 5312 feet in under 7 miles. Even having just completed one of the world’s steepest climbs the week prior (Telescope Peak [11,000ft] from Badwater [-280ft]),… continue reading

Chief pete the Westfalia

Still in Love with the Van

I haven’t written about my van Chief Pete in almost a year so I thought it important to announce that yes! I still have him and yes! I’m still very much in love with him and no! There are no plans to part ways.

Here are some things I did with him this year, besides driving. I saved a lot of money by doing all the work myself, but still, it’s obvious I still spend what little money I do have on this Vanagon. Hey! He’s my home!

Painting projects Repack passenger front wheel bearings

Where are my pictures for this? I mostly wish I had a picture of how I rode my mountain bike 10 miles with the rotor in my backpack so that they could help me remove the old bearings at Les Schwab. They certainly loved seeing me pull the big, heavy rotor out of a backpack… continue reading

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